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Editorial

Ayal Pinkus

Hi there!
So, I'm a bit stunned.

I'm editing Don Quixote Volume One, and I am almost nearing the end of the book. Don Quixote is fundamentally about poking fun at the popular literature of the time, novels of chivalry, and theater plays that were similarly written to appeal to a broader audience, which were popular but, Cervantes apparently believes, poorly written.

Now, almost at the end, the Barber and the Preacher from his village carry him home in a wooden cage, hoping to cure him of his insanity he contracted while reading such novels of chivalry.

In that chapter, I think Cervantes is giving us his opinion on what should be done about it. Hold on to your seats, because this will blow you away:

He wants the government to sensor theater plays!

Seriously. Cervantes thinks it is best if the government censored art.

This book is excellent, and it is a thoroughly enjoyable read, but I don't know about his conclusion though...

Different times, then, maybe. I don't think anyone nowadays would want the government to censor art.

It's funny, because the first thing people seem to think of when they think of Don Quixote, is fighting windmills. But the book is about Cervantes trying to convince you that the arts should be censored by the government.

I bet that's something you didn't know about Don Quixote!

Yours truly,
Ayal Pinkus

To be continued next Sunday

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